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Eyes Like Stars

Eyes Like Stars  - Lisa Mantchev Originally published on my blog:
http://vanillamoonblog.com/2013/03/30/review-eyes-like-stars-theatre-illuminata-1-lisa-mantchev/

"Eyes Like Stars" has grabbed my attention almost an year ago, when I got my Kindle. The title, the cover, the plot... they all intrigued me. I added the book to my to-be-read pile, and forgot about it... until now. What made me remember was taking part in a Paranormal Reading Challenge that required reading a book with Fae for the month of March. And so I realised there was a Faery book I really wanted to read for a long time.

I must admit I was very confused at the beggining of this book. Though I knew what it was about, it took me a chapter or two to realise that the Players were all the actual characters from plays, with Bertie being the only one who didn't truly belong... or so it seemed.

I really missed reading about a character as unique as Bertie was. Her imagination and rebelious attitude, combined with her smart lines and her sense of humour made her a very realistic character, one easy to like.

I found the dialogues very well written, at times hilarious,


“You didn't just write the play, Bertie," Peaseblossom said suddenly. "You ordered the Players about, shouted, and threw an artistic hissy fit. Do you know what that makes you?"
"A temperamental fusspot?" Mustardseed guessed.
"Crazier than a bag full of crazy?" Moth said.
"Close," Peaseblossom said. "It makes her a Director.”



...but inspirational and touching at the right moment.


“It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.”



Though I'm tired of finding love triangles in so many books lately, the one in this book is so subtle and realistic, that I couldn't not enjoy it. Nate (the pirate) is a funny character, and I cheered for him most of the time, while Ariel (from Shakespeare's "Tempest") is charming and seductive, and at times very annoying.

The faeries (from A Midsummer Night's Dream) were a cute addition to the story. I found their role in the story quite interesting, and I couldn't help being amused by their hilarious behaviour, and touched by their loialty to Bertie.

The story is unique, full of interesting ideas, none of which I would've thought of. Just when I thought I had it all figured out, boom! - a surprise is thrown at me.

This goes without saying on my favourites shelf, and as much as I would've loved to give it a 5-vanilla-flower rating, I am forced to take one out due to the confusing parts. I'm definitely reading the sequel as soon as I can, as I must find out what happens to Bertie, Nate, Ariel and the faeries.

I recommend this book to those in search of something different.